Space, The Final Frontier.

Posted by mortal 
Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 11:25AM
Posted by: mortal
Post your space stuff. :-)
I'll kick it off with this,

Galactic Center of Milky Way Rises over Texas Star Party.




and this.

Hubbles final service mission.
[www.boston.com]



Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 05/27/2009 09:59AM by mortal.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 01:57PM
Posted by: senninho
That first video is beautiful.



Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 09:11PM
Posted by: n00binio
quality thread :)

some tributes i stumbeled upon some time ago, to honour 14 people who paid the ultimate price

[www.chrisvalentines.com] (~10 min)

[www.chrisvalentines.com] (~20 min)

[www.chrisvalentines.com] (~10 min)

warning: very unfunny



- GPGSL's Nick Heidfeld
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 10:09PM
Posted by: The Lopper
Superb thread mortal!

Nobody explains space quite as well as Bill Bryson. An extract from A Short History of Nearly Everything, Chapter II - Welcome to the Solar System


...Space you see, is just enormous - just enormous. Let's imagine, for purposes of edification and entertainment, that we are about to go on a journey by rocketship. We won't go terribly far - just to the edge of our own solar system - but we need to get a fix on how big a place space is and what a small part of it we occupy.

Now the bad news, I'm afraid, is that we won't be home for supper. Even at the speed of light (300,000 kilometres per second) it would take seven hours to get to Pluto. But of course we can't travel at anything like that speed. We'll have to go at the speed of a space-ship, and these are rather more lumbering. The best speeds yet achieved by any human object are those of the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecrafts, which are flying away from us at about 56,000 kph.

The reason the Voyager craft were launched when they were (in August and September 1977) was that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were aligned in a way that happens only once every 175 years. This enabled the two Voyagers to use a 'gravity assist' technique in which the craft were succesively flung from one gassy giant to the next in a kind of cosmic version of crack the whip. Even so, it took them nine years to reach Uranus and a dozen to cross the orbit of Pluto. The good news is that if we wait until January 2006 we can take advantage of favourable Jovian positioning, plus some advances in technology, and get there in only a decade or so - though getting home again will take rather longer, I'm afraid. At all events it's going to be a long trip.

Now, the first thing you are likely to realise is that space is extremely well named and rather dismayingly uneventful. Our solar system may be the liveliest thing for trillions of miles, but all the visible stuff in it - the Sun, the planets and their moons, the billion or so tumbling rocks of the asteroid belt, comets and other miscellaneous drifting detritus - fills less than a trillionth of the available space. You also quickly realise than none of the maps you have ever seen of the solar system was drawn remotely to scale. Most schoolroom charts show the planets coming one after the other at neighbourly intervals - the outer giants actually cast shadows over each other in many illustrations - but this is a necessary deceit to get them all on the same piece of paper. Neptune in reality isn't a little bit beyond Jupiter, it's way beyond Jupiter - five times further from Jupiter than Jupiter is from us, so far out that it receives only 3 per cent as much sunlight as Jupiter.

Such are the distances, in fact, that it isn't possible, in any practical terms, to draw the solar system to scale. Even if you added lots of fold-out pages to your textbooks or used a really long sheet of paper, you wouln't come close. On a diagram of the solar system to scale, with the Earth reduced to the size of a pea, Jupiter would be over 300 metres away and Pluto would be two and a half kilometres distant (and about the size of a bacterium, so you wouldn't be able to see it anyway). On the same scale, Proxima Centauri, our nearest star, would be 16,000 kilometres away. Even if you shrank down everything so that Jupiter was as small as the full stop at the end of this sentence, and Pluto was no bigger than a molecule, Pluto would still be over 10 metres away...

...Now, the other thing you will notice as we speed past Pluto is that we are speeding past Pluto. If you check your itinerary, you will see that this is a trip to the edge of our solar system, and I'm afraid we're not there yet. Pluto may be the last object marked on schoolroom maps, but the system doesn't end there. In fact it isn't even close to ending there. We won't get to the solar system's edge until we have passed through the Oort cloud, a vast celestial realm of drifting comets, and we won't reach the Oort cloud for another - I'm so sorry about this - ten thousand years. Far from marking the outer edge of the solar system, as those maps so cavalierly imply, Pluto is barely one-fifty-thousandth of the way.


Buy this book! :)

//Edit: Really should have proof read this for spelling mistakes!



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 05/20/2009 01:31AM by The Lopper.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 10:18PM
Posted by: n00binio
The Lopper schrieb:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Buy this book! :)

+1 , one of the must reads



- GPGSL's Nick Heidfeld
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 19, 2009 11:21PM
Posted by: The Lopper
Postcards from Mars:


The Road Less Travelled: NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity climbed out of "Victoria Crater" following the tracks it had made when it descended into the 800-meter-diameter (half-mile-diameter) bowl nearly a year earlier




The interior of a crater surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity at Meridiani Planum on Mars can be seen in this color image from the rover's panoramic camera. This is the darkest landing site ever visited by a spacecraft on Mars. The rim of the crater is approximately 10 meters (32 feet) from the rover. The crater is estimated to be 20 meters (65 feet) in diameter.




Sweeping View of the "Columbia Hills" and Gusev Crater taken by rover Spirit




This view was taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on the rover's 87th martian day, or sol (April 1, 2004), just after Spirit left "Bonneville Crater." It shows the terrain to be covered in the trek towards the "Columbia Hills" in the background. Barely visible to the right of the hills is the outline of the distant rim of Gusev Crater.




NASA'S Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this westward view from atop a low plateau where Sprit spent the closing months of 2007.


It really, really makes you want to go there! :)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/19/2009 11:23PM by The Lopper.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 12:18AM
Posted by: n00binio
awesome pics :)

a site with a new astronomy related photo every day:

[antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov]

(the pic loaded when clicking the link is my desktop wallpaper atm)



- GPGSL's Nick Heidfeld
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 12:52AM
Posted by: mortal
Found 3 copies of the Bryson book on ebay, see if I can snaffle one. :-)
I read somewhere recently that the Mars NASA pics were faked, that in reality the sky was blue. NASA wouldn't lie to us would they? Would they.....? ;-)



Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 08:18AM
Posted by: mortal




Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 12:06PM
Posted by: The Lopper
Awesome pic, I think I may rob that for an album cover. ;) And that ring of fire pic makes me think of Sauron from LoTR.
Deffo snap up one of those Bryson books. Not just a great read, but an education also.





Now then, compare this so-called "False Colour" photo from Mars with the last one I posted above...I think NASA have been rumbled, the sky is clearly blue. ;-)


Any of you guys ever see the Aurora Borealis/Australis? About 4-5 years ago it was really clear over our latitudes, the whole sky was shifting hues of greens,reds and purples. Incredible stuff, truly awe-inspiring. And if that was amazing, I can barely imagine how magnificent it is in the high latitudes.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/20/2009 12:09PM by The Lopper.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 01:49PM
Posted by: senninho
The Lopper Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Awesome pic, I think I may rob that for an album
> cover. ;) And that ring of fire pic makes me think
> of Sauron from LoTR.
> Deffo snap up one of those Bryson books. Not just
> a great read, but an education also.
>
>
>
> [marsrovers.nasa.gov]
> 080103a/1198865273_31824-1_Sol1369A_WestValley_L25
> 7F_br.jpg
>
> Now then, compare this so-called "False Colour"
> photo from Mars with the last one I posted
> above...I think NASA have been rumbled, the sky is
> clearly blue. ;-)
>
>
> Any of you guys ever see the Aurora
> Borealis/Australis? About 4-5 years ago it was
> really clear over our latitudes, the whole sky was
> shifting hues of greens,reds and purples.
> Incredible stuff, truly awe-inspiring. And if that
> was amazing, I can barely imagine how magnificent
> it is in the high latitudes.

Tsk, *all* images from Mars are 'false colour' - the landers send back raw data that has to be compiled into an actual image. The colours are always tarnished by an element of artistic licence - therefore, it's just as likely that this pic has been given more blue than necessary ;)

As for the aurorae - we're at too low a latitude for them, which is annoying :(



Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 02:47PM
Posted by: sasjag


Sim


All Hail The New York Giants - Winners of Superbowl XXI, XXV and XLII!

"I'd love to know what goes on in that crazy head of yours sometimes, Sim..." - Locke Cole
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 02:55PM
Posted by: senninho
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 03:18PM
Posted by: mortal
I lol'd. +1 :-)

Check out this site. [www.spaceweather.com]



Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 04:28PM
Posted by: The Lopper
Tsk, *all* images from Mars are 'false colour' - the landers send back raw data that has to be compiled into an actual image. The colours are always tarnished by an element of artistic licence - therefore, it's just as likely that this pic has been given more blue than necessary

Yep, they're all "coloured in" by NASA engineers. The true colour images they release are those that they colour in according to the testing they did with the imaging devices on Earth, trying to simulate the Martian conditions, ie in a vacuum, replicating the sunlight, etc. The False colour images depart from that method. Dunno why they do that, perhaps they try to make Mars look more like Earth, but I think the so-called True colour images are far more spectacular.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 06:40PM
Posted by: mcdo
n00binio Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> quality thread :)
>
> some tributes i stumbeled upon some time ago, to
> honour 14 people who paid the ultimate price
>
> [www.chrisvalentines.com]
> .html (~10 min)
>
> [www.chrisvalentines.com]
> ml (~20 min)
>
> [www.chrisvalentines.com]
> lumbia/index.html (~10 min)
>
> warning: very unfunny


He who binds to himself a joy,
Does the winged life destroy.
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity's sun rise.

William Blake


They braved the greatest depth for all of us. Meanwhile, Earth is growing sick of its wildest child.
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 20, 2009 11:30PM
Posted by: n00binio
mcdo schrieb:
-------------------------------------------------------
> He who binds to himself a joy,
> Does the winged life destroy.
> But he who kisses the joy as it flies
> Lives in eternity's sun rise.
>
> William Blake

a beautiful poem

@ mal: indeed a great site, i used it for searching opportunities to view an iss flyby



- GPGSL's Nick Heidfeld
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 23, 2009 01:43AM
Posted by: mortal
A new sunspot?
[spaceweather.com]




Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 27, 2009 10:00AM
Posted by: mortal
Got my Bill Bryson book today. Sixteen bucks on ebay incl P&P. Sweet! :-)



Some GP4 Stuff. [www.mediafire.com] Some say you should click it, you know you want to. :-)
[www.gp4central.com] <----GP4 Central
GPGSL Wiki [gpgsuperleague.wikia.com]
Re: Space, The Final Frontier.
Date: May 27, 2009 06:10PM
Posted by: n00binio
truly a great book



- GPGSL's Nick Heidfeld
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